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Railguns probably not ideal vs. gas pressure guns?

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750 750's picture
Basically turning the M16
Basically turning the M16 into something of a "needle" gun?
Trekkin Trekkin's picture
crizh wrote:
crizh wrote:
To take that to its logical idiocy, if you were to 'Railgun' an M16 so that it fired a projectile with the same energy at 7000m/s, the projectile would weigh 0.072g and the recoil energy of each shot would be less than a thousandth of a modern M16. The impulse would go up a bit but you would probably feel less than two hundredths of the kick. And a magazine would hold over a thousand rounds.
I would assume, though, that as logically ideal as that is, it'd be so susceptible to perturbation by air currents that accuracy would suffer. Then, too, would it have enough momentum to effectively penetrate?
crizh crizh's picture
Trekkin wrote:crizh wrote:
Trekkin wrote:
crizh wrote:
To take that to its logical idiocy, if you were to 'Railgun' an M16 so that it fired a projectile with the same energy at 7000m/s, the projectile would weigh 0.072g and the recoil energy of each shot would be less than a thousandth of a modern M16. The impulse would go up a bit but you would probably feel less than two hundredths of the kick. And a magazine would hold over a thousand rounds.
I would assume, though, that as logically ideal as that is, it'd be so susceptible to perturbation by air currents that accuracy would suffer. Then, too, would it have enough momentum to effectively penetrate?
Here my knowledge runs out. To Wikipedia!
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Trekkin Trekkin's picture
Well, the numbers themselves
Well, the numbers themselves are relatively easy to work out. Assuming we stick with the M16 standard 5.56x45 NATO, momentum goes down by a factor of 7, but the cross-sectional area of the bullet goes down by a factor of 15 (assuming the density is kept constant), so I don't know what that does to the pressure.
crizh crizh's picture
Wikipedia
According to the page on Needleguns the problem is over-penetration. The flechettes are moving so fast that they pass right through the target doing minimal damage. You need to design them to mushroom, fragment or tumble on contact with your designated target.
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
Trekkin Trekkin's picture
crizh wrote:According to the
crizh wrote:
According to the page on Needleguns the problem is over-penetration. The flechettes are moving so fast that they pass right through the target doing minimal damage. You need to design them to mushroom, fragment or tumble on contact with your designated target.
Well, bang goes my theory. Apparently penetration is related to KE, just like damage, but recoil is momentum-based. So railguns would logically be, effectively, needle guns firing projectiles designed to deflect and shatter on impact, yes? Most of the other technical issues are easily overcome by the reliance on electromagnetic propulsion, since that removes the question of barrel seals and so forth. So how well would a quench gun work on a needle with a superconducting coil in its base?
750 750's picture
crizh wrote:According to the
crizh wrote:
According to the page on Needleguns the problem is over-penetration. The flechettes are moving so fast that they pass right through the target doing minimal damage. You need to design them to mushroom, fragment or tumble on contact with your designated target.
A hollow point like design at the business end of the "needle" may take care of that.
Arenamontanus Arenamontanus's picture
Nanomaterials can do any kind
Nanomaterials can do any kind of mushrooming you like. I suspect quenchguns can handle needles fairly well. The issue is likely the length of different coils (a long projectile needs long coils). But if the needle is non-magnetic across most of its length and just has a short "driver" ferrous core it might work well.
Extropian
crizh crizh's picture
Nanomaterials
I imagine we've barely scratched the surface of what we could achieve with creative use of nanomaterials. When I start to think about it I get all giddy and I can feel massive wall of text posts bulging out of my fingertips... Time to take some deep breaths and do something real.
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.

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