Question about "Gatecrashing"

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GregH GregH's picture
Question about "Gatecrashing"

Might be waaaayyyy to early to ask, but thought I would. As "Gatecrashing" covers extrasolar exploration is there any plans for a star system-generation ruleset to add to EP? Also any chance on meeting the Factor's patrons?

jackgraham jackgraham's picture
Get a copy of Traveller: Book

Get a copy of Traveller: Book 3, Worlds & Adventures (Game Designer's Workshop, 1977). I still have a copy on my desk. The AD&D 2nd edition Spelljammer "Practical Planetology" book is also a fun read, if less much scientific (the funny thing about this book is that some of the more outlandish ideas in it actually seem more likely given some astronomical discoveries since it was published).


I don't know if we're going to put out anything about star system design. The best information you can get on this comes from real life astronomy. The physical laws of our universe mean that configurations similar to our own solar system are likely quite common, with dense, terrestrial planets close to the star they orbit, while gas giants and icy bodies are farther out. If you learn about stellar classifications (G, M, K, &c.) and the mechanics of system & planet formation, you'll be well on your way to crafting realistic star systems.


Similarly, if you learn about planet formation and start at the level of geology, it's not hard to extrapolate what sort of planet you'll end up with. I relied heavily on _The New Solar System_ (Beatty, et. al.) and the _NASA Atlas of the Solar System_ in writing the System Gazetteer. The former was especially useful in learning about why certain classifications of planets (gas giants, ice giants, plutoids, &c.) form as they do.


Point being, EP is set in the real universe. There are plenty of great science texts that already explain how all this stuff works.


As for the Factors, we had a long talk about them at Gen Con. But that's classified for now. :)

J A C K   G R A H A M :: Hooray for Earth!
  http://eclipsephase.com :: twitter @jackgraham @faketsr :: Google+Jack Graham

jackgraham jackgraham's picture
research/hypothesize/twist

Hmm, might help if I explain how this process can work. A good example is the star system Luca, described in Core. The planet onto which the gates open, Luca II, is in the terrestrial sweet spot where earth-like planets can arise, but the system has one major fault if you're a life-form: it only has one gas giant, and no ice giants. Giant planets help shield other planets within their orbits from asteroid impacts, so Luca, with little such protection, has a dusty atmosphere and a heavily cratered surface from constant bombardment. It's colder than it should be for where it is relative to its star, thanks to the nuclear winter-like effects of bombardment. It's older than Earth, so like Mars, it doesn't have much tectonic activity and has experienced little resurfacing in the last few billion years, leading to a lot of low, broken hills and cratered plains. With few mountains to break up storms, the weather is decidedly crappy.


So what kind of life do you get on a planet like this? Much of it might be subterranean, or at least burrowing. The planet's only sentients evolved from insect mound predators, then died out. What's described of them follows from their environment: they had infrared vision, and their civilization never really took off. Sadly, they were doomed by their unfortunate celestial position. A major asteroid impact ultimately did them in.


Luca II is one of the less exotic exoplanets, but hopefully this illustrates the process well: start with science, make some predictions, and then twist them around until they're sufficiently interesting.

J A C K   G R A H A M :: Hooray for Earth!
  http://eclipsephase.com :: twitter @jackgraham @faketsr :: Google+Jack Graham

GregH GregH's picture
Thanks for the info, it'll

Thanks for the info, it'll help a lot. On that note can I ask two more general questions? It seems that each location (based at least on what's in the core book) either leads to a life-supporting world or one that hold evidence of former intelligence, or both... Does this hold true for every gate destination? Or are there some that lead to systems with nothing of interest that can be found? Also are these things like the widgets from "Stargate" where you emerge from another gate at your destination? Or does the gate drop you off and then open another wormhole at your departure point? If the latter I can see why there is so many issues just calculating where the thing goes ("damn! missed a decimal point and they ended up in the magma layer... load up the backup!")

CodeBreaker CodeBreaker's picture
There is mention of

There is mention of Xenosystem Gates just floating in space (I cannot find it now, but it is somewhere), so yes I imagine there are ones that go to places in the middle of nowhere. Hell, there might be ones that are literally in the middle of nowhere. Now think how useful such a location could be do a Corporate Entity. A point in the galaxy that only has one entry point. The only way in is through the space gate, unless you have FTL tech.

And I am almost certain that gates exist on both sides of the connection, much like Stargates do. In fact they work almost exactly like Stargates do. You dial in a connection address, walk through and you emerge in an instant (The fluff says an instant, but sometimes that instant can seem to last like an eternity) on the other side. Special magic stuff makes it so atmosphere does not transfer, just like a gate. I wonder what happens when you fire a gun through one. Or a laser.

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jackgraham jackgraham's picture
Yup. Some of the gates lead

Yup. Some of the gates lead to extremely hostile environments. The ones we describe in Core are best as hooks for a "low level" party, because they're more survivable.


Gates have a device at both ends which remain in operation for as long as the window is open.

J A C K   G R A H A M :: Hooray for Earth!
  http://eclipsephase.com :: twitter @jackgraham @faketsr :: Google+Jack Graham

Slith Slith's picture
http://direpress.bin.sh/tools

http://direpress.bin.sh/tools/system.cgi



This will generate a solar system for you.

GregH GregH's picture
Interesting... Thanks!

Interesting... Thanks!