Campaigns and Scenarios

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willzuma willzuma's picture
Campaigns and Scenarios

Been a long time reader of the forums, first time posting.

I wrote a scenario called "One Last Midnight" for Eclipse Phase and wanted to share it here. It's the first scenario in a larger campaign which is only outlined at this point. If enough people like the scenario I'll share the campaign outline I made on Prezi.

Check it out: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1rw9ekUHID1SwrzkbfiywILfPVe_cBUojr0jCs7BO2vQ/edit?usp=sharing

Scenario was designed with beginners in mind, BUT it work for level of experienced player I think. It's a classic police procedural with a Firewall twist. I was inspired by scenario seeds from Sunward. Someone is attacking synths and stealing their cyberbrains for some nefarious purpose.

Enjoy.

uwtartarus uwtartarus's picture
Interesting scenario. Love

Interesting scenario. Love that it expands on the hook in Sunward.

Is the weapon a "narco-algorithm" or "nanotoxin" or "nanoswarm" ? You used the terms interchangeably and that was confusing. Narco-algorithms are drugs that cyberbrains/synths can take, while nanotoxin are nanites but don't swarm (fought off with nanophages rather than Guardian Nanoswarm). Just a technical thing.

An enjoyable read!

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ShadowDragon8685 ShadowDragon8685's picture
In my experience, running a

In my experience, running a whodunit is... Very, very difficult.

What seems obvious to the GM/module author can, in fact, frustrate players. Hopefully not to the level of being insane troll logic, but I've had players who were otherwise calm, calculating, social/analytical players ready to go with the brute-force black-bag-and-interrogate-the-stacks approach on their only remote persons of interest.

Of course, that's my data point. I may quite simply be rubbish at running a whodunit. (Also, if you're going to throw characters into a whodunit, make sure they actually have skills appropriate to solving a crime. I threw a combat monkey, a medic, a vehicle pilot and a technician at a group of highly-skilled ego hunters, and they're having the devil's time. I should've thought that one through a lot better.)

Some things stand out to me:
As uwtartarus pointed out, nanotoxins and narcoalgorithyms are not the same thing. A nanotoxin is a nanite swarm which infects and damages a body, while a narcoalgorithym is computer code you run on a cyberbrain or brain-state emulator - an infomorph can "enjoy" (or enjoy) narcoalgorithyms, as can all of synths, pods, and cyberbrained biomorphs.

Cyberbrains are easy enough to manufacture, and it would be simpler for Charlie to have done it with forks of himself than to kidnap random people - less likely to draw attention. Then again, if he's being driven by a basilisk hack, drawing attention may well be the point.

Silencing the screams of the victims in chapter 2 would be easily accomplished by simply disconnecting the speaker, or ordering your muse to filter out the unwanted input.

Anyway, it's a good module plot, but you've omitted a lot of key details - stats for NPCs, both named and generic, pretty much everything relating to the Moderates, etc. Still, a GM who needed an idea but didn't mind doing his own building could work from it.

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willzuma willzuma's picture
ShadowDragon8685 wrote:Some

ShadowDragon8685 wrote:
Some things stand out to me:
As uwtartarus pointed out, nanotoxins and narcoalgorithyms are not the same thing. A nanotoxin is a nanite swarm which infects and damages a body, while a narcoalgorithym is computer code you run on a cyberbrain or brain-state emulator - an infomorph can "enjoy" (or enjoy) narcoalgorithyms, as can all of synths, pods, and cyberbrained biomorphs.

Thanks for pointing that out. It is a editorial error. It is a nano-toxin. It was changed from the original draft and I forgot to fix all of the mentions.

ShadowDragon8685 wrote:
Cyberbrains are easy enough to manufacture, and it would be simpler for Charlie to have done it with forks of himself than to kidnap random people - less likely to draw attention. Then again, if he's being driven by a basilisk hack, drawing attention may well be the point.

Essentially, his machine requires not one very loud voice repeated over and over, but many voices like an unholy choir singing out into the dark between the stars calling for self-annhilation.

ShadowDragon8685 wrote:
Silencing the screams of the victims in chapter 2 would be easily accomplished by simply disconnecting the speaker, or ordering your muse to filter out the unwanted input.

Thanks for saying this. It points out i need to be more specific with description. The scream is an attack with both a damaging sonic component and an audio basilisk hack component. It is inelegant, so its like being spammed with Charlie's flavor of crazy. Once it hits it requires a very difficult interfacing roll for your muse to turn it off. The "scream" is much like gazing into Nietzsche's abyss. You can't look away or turn your head once you stare into it. If they do turn off the input they have to shut off ALL audio perceptions as it's digital/mesh aspect hacks through filters. Which means they won't hear Charlie coming. :)

As for disconnecting the speakers. That IS exactly the kind of thinking the scenario aspires to put in its players. It is one of the methods players can and should use to turn it off. Granted, the infernal machine's wiring is godforsakenly messy and complex. So it requires a few actions.

I will perhaps need to write that detail and clarify the hacking nature of the sonic attack.

ShadowDragon8685 wrote:
Anyway, it's a good module plot, but you've omitted a lot of key details - stats for NPCs, both named and generic, pretty much everything relating to the Moderates, etc. Still, a GM who needed an idea but didn't mind doing his own building could work from it.

The ommited detail is intentional. I hate shoe-horned and specific modules and I wrote this more specific than I usually do for scenarios I don't share. Especially writing down stats. I hate writing the stats for a combat NPC only for the PC's to completely sneak around him or use rapport. I went in with the Anders Sandberg school of module writing. Focus on the plot and the connection points, trust the GM and the players to fill in the gaps.